Family Caregivers and Home Care

Family Caregivers and Home Care

Caring for an ailing family member is difficult work, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be unpaid work.  Traditionally, Medicaid has paid for long-term care in a nursing home, but because most individuals would rather be cared for at home and home care is cheaper, all 50 states now have Medicaid programs that offer at least some home care. In some states, even family members can get paid for providing care at home.  The programs vary by state, and also include some non-Medicaid-related programs.

Medicaid’s program began as “cash and counseling,” but is now often called “self-directed,” “consumer-directed,” or “participant-directed” care.  The first step is to apply for Medicaid through a home-based Medicaid program.  Medicaid is available only to low-income seniors, and each state has different eligibility requirements.  Medicaid application approval can take months, and there also may be a waiting list to receive benefits under the program.

The state Medicaid agency usually conducts an assessment to determine the recipient’s care needs—e.g., how much help the Medicaid recipient needs with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, eating, and moving.  Once the assessment is complete, the state draws up a budget, and the recipient can use the allotted funds to pay for goods or services related to care, including paying a caregiver.  Each state offers different benefits coverage.  Some services that Medicaid may pay for include the following:

  • In-home health care
  • Personal care services, such as help bathing, eating, and moving
  • Home care services, including help with household chores like shopping or laundry
  • Caregiver support
  • Minor modifications to the home to make it accessible
  • Medical equipment

The Medicaid applicant must apply for Medicaid and select a program that allows the recipient to choose his or her own caregiver, often called “consumer directed care.”  Recipients can choose to pay a family member as a caregiver, but states vary on which family members are allowed.  For example, most states prevent caregivers from hiring a spouse, and some states do not allow recipients to hire a caregiver who lives with them.  Most programs allow ex-spouses, in-laws, children, and grandchildren to serve as paid caregivers, but states typically require that family caregivers be paid less than the market rate in order to prevent fraud.

In addition to Medicaid programs, some states have non-Medicaid programs that also allow for self-directed care. These programs may have different eligibility requirements than Medicaid and are different in each state. Family caregivers can also be paid using a “caregiver contract,” increasingly used as part of Medicaid planning.

To inquire more on how to utilize family caregivers for long-term care needs, whether for yourself or for an aging parent or relative, please contact our office for a free consultation at (239) 418-0169.