Next Steps When the Diagnosis is Alzheimer’s

Next Steps When the Diagnosis is Alzheimer’s

Next Steps When the Diagnosis is Alzheimer’s: We hope to enjoy out golden years, relaxing after decades of working and raising children. However, as we age, the likelihood of experiencing health issue increase. That includes Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Learning that a loved one has Alzheimer’s or other diseases that require a great deal of health care is devastating to the individual and their families. The progressive nature of these diseases means that while the person doesn’t need intensive health care yet, eventually they will. According to an article from Newsmax, “5 Insurance Steps After Alzheimer’s Strikes Loved One,” the planning for care needs to start immediately.

Alzheimer’s Disease International predicts that 44 million individuals worldwide have Alzheimer’s or a similar form of dementia, and 25% of those living with it never receive a diagnosis. Healthcare, including assisted living, memory care and in-home care is expensive. Health insurance is an important component of managing the ongoing expenses of living with Alzheimer’s.

Look at your existing policies. There are different types of coverage, depending on the policy type and company. Review current insurance policies to determine if the level of coverage is acceptable and how much will be required to be paid out-of-pocket. See if there’s existing coverage for long-term care, hospital care, doctors’ fees, prescriptions and home health care.

Maintain those policies. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act does offer some protections for those diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. They can now access government subsidies to help them purchase health insurance and the Affordable Care Act prohibits pre-existing condition exclusions and cancellation, because the policyholder is considered high cost.

Look into long-term care insurance. This is a way to protect the patient and the family financially, when the day arrives when long-term care is necessary. When diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, a person isn’t eligible for long-term care insurance.

In addition to verifying and reviewing insurance coverage, there are some additional tasks that every family should address in the early stages of a diagnosis.

Sign an advance directive. This document allows patients to voice how they want their healthcare and decisions handled, before they are no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. In addition, they should have a living will that states their wishes for medical treatment, a designated power of attorney to can make financial decision, and a DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) order, if that is their wish.

Get estate planning done. Time is of the essence, as the estate plan must be completed while the person still has the mental capacity to understand what they are doing. Three documents are necessary: a last will and testament, a power of attorney so that an agent be named can handle finances and a health care power of attorney for health care decisions. An estate planning attorney will be able to work with the family to make any necessary legal preparations.

Reference: Newsmax (June 28, 2019) “5 Insurance Steps After Alzheimer’s Strikes Loved One”