How Do Farmers Start an Estate Plan?

How Do Farmers Start an Estate Plan?  The Bangor Daily News explains in its article “How farmers can start an estate plan” that we all know we’re going to die, but it’s not our favorite thing to talk about. However, it’s important to start these conversations.

The article helps aging farmers who want to get started with the estate planning process, by sharing some tips to clear up some of the confusion, eliminate questions in the process and motivate you to begin your estate planning journey.

One expert described the process as a business transition. It is not unlike retirement decisions that somebody might make for a job. However, it is much more complicated, because there are many more resources to address (and perhaps many more people).

Clearly defined goals will make that transition much easier for everyone involved. Memorialize your goals by writing them down, along with your dreams for the transfer of the farm. Don’t forget to include your fears.

A basic estate plan can be as simple as a will, a medical directive and a power of attorney. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to facilitate the various elements of estate planning.

Make a complete inventory of all assets you own, including the deeds to all the tracts of land in your possession.

Identify a successor, so you know who will take over the farm when you die. It’s essential to ensuring the longevity of the farm business you worked so hard to create. As far as transferring your assets in family farm businesses, inter-generational politics can be dicey, when it comes to estate planning. It really boils down to the succession of your farm from one generation to another.

You must be certain to do this in an orderly way to make sure the needs of both generations are met.

If you don’t have a family member interested in taking over the farm, there are local agencies that can help you find young farmers to whom you can sell and who would be able to take over the business.

When it comes to estate planning, it is never too early to begin.

Reference: Bangor Daily News (March 5, 2020) “How farmers can start an estate plan”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

How to protect your child from identity theft

How to protect your child from identity theft: In 2017, over a million children were affected by identity fraud. Families paid over $540 million in out-of-pocket costs towards a total of $2.6 billion in losses.

While parents already have plenty to worry about, there are easy, proactive steps they can take to protect their children from identity theft.

The key to preventing any kind of identity theft  — yours or your child’s — is to be proactive, not reactive. Taking the time now to protect your child’s identity can save you a big headache in the long run and provide them with the foundation for financial success.

Thankfully, there are many ways for parents to protect their child’s identity against fraudsters. Below, CNBC Select spoke to Liz Lasher, VP of fraud and financial crimes at FICO, about the best actions parents can take to protect their child from a stolen identity.

How to protect your child from identity theft

  1. Freeze your child’s credit.
  2. Monitor both of your credit reports.
  3. Check social media privacy settings.
  4. Keep your eye out for unexpected mail in your child’s name.
  5. Freeze your child’s credit

credit freeze restricts access to your credit report, which helps safeguard against fraudsters opening unauthorized accounts in your name. You should have a credit freeze in place for yourself at all times, except when you’re applying for new credit. And if your child is under 18, their credit reports should be frozen as soon as possible.

“Freeze your children’s credit if they are young, as they won’t need it for many years,” Lasher says.

You’ll need to initiate credit freezes with all three credit bureaus (Experian, Equifax and TransUnion) to ensure your child’s credit reports are all frozen. While this process can normally be completed in under 10 minutes for adults, for children it is “time consuming, but worthwhile,” Lasher says.

“The three major credit bureaus in the U.S. currently do not offer an online portal to freeze your children’s credit, even if they have them to freeze your own credit,” Lasher says.

So you’ll need to print out forms with each bureau, fill them out, provide copies of required documentation, such as your driver’s license and your child’s birth certificate, and mail the completed forms and documents to each bureau.

Here are the links to freeze your child’s credit with each bureau:

“You will receive a confirmation letter in the mail, which you should store in your safe so that you have the documentation to unfreeze credit when it is time,” Lasher explains.

Once your child meets authorized user age requirements, you can add them to your credit card account. This allows them to piggyback off your credit and establish a credit score, even while their credit is frozen.

  1. Monitor both of your credit reports

“Monitor your credit report on an annual basis, and teach your kids (if they are old enough) how to do it too,” Lasher says. It’s also a good idea to check your child’s credit report to verify that the credit freeze took effect and periodically check it wasn’t removed.

You can monitor credit reports annually for free at annualcreditreport.com, which is authorized by federal law and provides a free copy of your credit report every 12 months from each credit bureau.

“You can also go to the bureaus — starting in 2020, everyone in the U.S. can get six free credit reports per year through 2026,” Lasher says. And if you want more comprehensive credit monitoring programs, companies like FICO offer paid services, that include credit scores, $1 million identity theft insurance and credit scores for mortgages, auto loans and more.

When you monitor your credit report, Lasher points out that you should look for any activity that is unexpected or out of the ordinary. That may be a new account, missed payment history or a new address.

If you find information that is incorrect, dispute it with the credit bureaus.

Learn more: What is credit monitoring and does it protect you from fraud?

  1. Check social media privacy settings

Social media can be seen as a gold mine of information for fraudsters. They can potentially access your name, birthdate, location and other personal information that can make it easy for them to forge an account in your child’s name.

Lasher recommends parents check their social media privacy settings for both their accounts and their child’s accounts, if they have them.

“Set a family policy around what should and should not be shared, and be sure to have a conversation with grandparents as well,” Lasher says. ”‘Grandsharenting’ is a thing, and has been contributing to the child identity theft problem.”

If you’re new to the term “grandsharenting,” it’s when grandparents overshare photos of their grandkids on social media. Whether it’s through posting pictures on Instagram or Facebook, this can lead to privacy concerns and identity theft. The risk gets greater if those photos are tagged with a location or display personal information, such as a birthday.

  1. Keep your eye out for unexpected mail in your child’s name

While you may have opted into paperless mail for financial products and bills, you may still receive the occasional targeted offer in the mail for opening a new credit account. This may not be surprising if you have an existing relationship with the marketer, but you should raise an eyebrow if your child gets similar mail.

“Keep your eye out for unexpected mail in your child’s name,” Lasher warns. “They probably shouldn’t be getting offers for vehicle financing or credit cards, and that would be a bad sign.”

Lasher also recommends signing up for the USPS Informed Delivery Program. With this free program, you can digitally preview your mail and manage any packages scheduled to arrive soon.

Learn more:

 

https://www.cnbc.com/select/how-to-protect-child-from-identity-theft/

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

When Should I Update My Estate Plan?

When Should I Update My Estate Plan? Forbes’ recent article entitled “Do You Need A Trust? 8 Important Goals A Trust Can Help You Achieve” discusses eight ways a trust can help you achieve specific legacy planning goals. The first step is to meet with an experienced estate planning attorney.

Everybody needs a will, but not everyone requires a trust. A trust provides greater flexibility and control over how your property and assets are distributed. Many people create a trust to avoid probate. As a result, it’s faster and easier for your named trustee(s) to distribute your assets to your heirs. There are a many different types of trusts with advantages and disadvantages. Talk about what will be best for you with your estate planning attorney.

  1. No probate. This process can take months or more to complete, and it can be very expensive. A trust is designed to settle your estate in a timely and relatively inexpensive manner.
  2. Privacy and confidentiality. Probate is public, so your will and other private financial and business info is available to everyone. However, a trust maintains privacy and confidentiality.
  3. Protection for beneficiaries. A trust can shield beneficiaries from lawsuits, creditors, or divorce. A trust can also protect the interests of a minor, by including direction for when distributions are made.
  4. Provide for children with special needs. This type of trust provides for the health care and personal needs of a minor child or adult who has special needs and won’t impact their eligibility for Medicaid benefits.
  5. Flexibility. As the creator of the trust, you determine the terms of the trust, and can put restrictions on how trust assets are managed. For instance, the trust could state that assets may only be used by the beneficiary to purchase a home or to pay medical bills but may not be distributed directly to the beneficiary.
  6. Preserve family wealth. Divorce and remarriage can result in assets that were supposed to stay in the family wind up leaving with the ex-spouse. A trust can make certain that your estate is preserved for grandchildren.
  7. Family values. A trust can be a wonderful way to pass down family values concerning education, home ownership, land conservation, community service, religious beliefs and other topics.
  8. Lessening family conflict. Challenging a trust is difficult and costly. Having a trust in place that clearly articulates your wishes for your family, reduces the potential for misunderstanding.

Whether you have a trust in place or are thinking about creating one, it’s important to meet regularly with your estate planning attorney to be certain your strategy and estate planning documents reflect any new state and federal tax laws, as well as any changes in your goals and circumstances.

Reference: Forbes (Feb. 24, 2020) “Do You Need A Trust? 8 Important Goals A Trust Can Help You Achieve”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

 

What Should I know about Financial Powers of Attorney?

What Should I know about Financial Powers of Attorney? A financial power of attorney is a document allowing an “attorney-in-fact” or “agent” to act on the principal’s behalf. It usually allows the agent to pay the principal’s bills, access her accounts, pay her taxes and buy and sell investments. This person, in effect, assumes the responsibilities of the principal and can act for the principal in all areas detailed in the document.

Kiplinger’s recent article from April entitled “What Are the Duties for Financial Powers of Attorney?” acknowledges that these responsibilities may sound daunting, and it’s only natural to feel a little overwhelmed initially. Here are some facts that will help you understand what you need to do.

Read and don’t panic. Review the power of attorney document and know the extent of what the principal has given you power to handle in their stead.

Understand the scope. Make a list of the principal’s assets and liabilities. If the individual for whom you’re caring is organized, then that will be simple. Otherwise, you will need to find these items:

  • Brokerage and bank accounts
  • Retirement accounts
  • Mortgage papers
  • Tax bills
  • Utility, phone, cable, and internet bills
  • Insurance premium invoices

Take a look at the principal’s spending patterns to see any recurring expenses. Review their mail for a month to help you to determine where the money comes and goes. If your principal is over age 72 and has granted you the power to manage her retirement plan, don’t forget to make any required minimum distributions (RMDs). If your principal manages her finances online, you’ll need to contact their financial institutions and establish that you have power of attorney, so that you can access these accounts.

Guard the principal’s assets. Make certain that her home is secure. You might make a video inventory of the residence. If it looks like your principal will be incapacitated for a long time, you might stop the phone and newspaper. Watch out for family members taking property and saying that it had been promised to them (or that it belonged to them all along).

Pay bills. Be sure to monitor your principal’s bills and credit card statements for potential fraud. You might temporarily suspend credit cards that you won’t be using on the principal’s behalf. Remember that they may have monthly bills paid automatically by credit card.

Pay taxes. Many powers of attorney give the agent the power to pay the principal’s taxes. If so, you’ll be responsible for filing and paying taxes during the principal’s lifetime. If the principal dies, the executor of the principal’s will is responsible and will prepare the final taxes.

Ask about estate planning. See if there is an estate plan and ask a qualified estate planning attorney for help. If the principal resides in a nursing home paid by Medicaid, talk to an elder law attorney as soon as possible to save the principal’s estate at least some of the costs of their care.

Keep records. Track your expenditures made on your principal’s behalf. This will help you demonstrate that you have upheld your duties and acted in the principal’s best interests, as well as for reimbursement for expenses.

Always act in the principal’s best interest. If you don’t precisely know the principal’s expectations, then always act with their best interests in mind. Contact the principal’s attorney who prepared the power of attorney for guidance.

Reference: Kiplinger (April 22, 2020) “What Are the Duties for Financial Powers of Attorney?”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

 

Is Your Estate Really as Set as You Think?

Is Your Estate Really as Set as You Think? Next Avenue’s recent article entitled “Is Your Estate as Planned As You Think?” explains that when you pass away your executor will have many tasks to perform when settling your estate.

It’s helpful to add clarity and lessen the burden of that person’s work in advance. Look at this list of things to make sure your estate is as planned as you think it is:

Is your will current? If you’ve written your will, how long has it been since you drafted it? Have there been any major changes in your life since that time? If so, it’s likely time to update it. Review your will to make certain that it’s an accurate representation of your assets and your wishes now.

Is your will detailed? Yes, you’ve addressed the big stuff, but what about smaller items with sentimental value? You should list who gets what, to avoid fighting.

Have you set out your wishes, so they’re legally binding? Each state has different rules as to what is required for a valid will. Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to make sure your will is valid.

Are your financial affairs organized? Your executor will need to know if you have any recurring payments, as well as your account number, and online passwords. Create a list of regular monthly bills, along with your account numbers and access codes to simplify your executor’s job.

You will also need to let the executor know about any automatic deductions or charges on your credit card, internet-based subscriptions, club memberships, recurring charitable donations and automatic utility payments.

Do you have a way to distribute your personal items? You should determine how your family will divide up the possessions not explicitly listed in your will, such as the lawnmower, dishes and photographs. All of it will need to be either distributed to one of your beneficiaries, donated, or sold.

Conducting comprehensive planning of your estate with an attorney can help ensure that there’s less stress and an easy distribution of your assets.

While speaking with your estate planning attorney, ask about appointing a guardian for your minor children in your will, a healthcare directive, a living will, a HIPAA waiver and whether you should have a trust.

Reference: Next Avenue (Feb. 25, 2020) “Is Your Estate as Planned As You Think?”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

 

Does Your Estate Plan Need a Will or a Trust Or Both?

Does Your Estate Plan Need a Will or a Trust—Or Both? Having a structure in place that clearly directs who is in charge and who gets what assets, gives most people a sense of relief about their estate plan. It’s important to understand how a will works, how a trust works and when to use each of these planning tools, reports the article “Revocable trust vs. will: A guide to estate planning in the age of coronavirus” from Bankrate. In many cases, using both achieves the ultimate goal of protecting the family assets and their privacy.

The will process is more complex than its typical portrayal in film or fiction. The will directs who is to receive the property of the deceased. Without a will, property may be distributed by the courts, following the “intestate succession” law of the state. That’s usually the next of kin—not always who you want to inherit your estate.

If property is owned jointly, then it passes to the surviving owner. Accounts and assets with a named beneficiary go directly to that beneficiary. Any assets held in a trust are subject to the directions in the trust. That is one reason to check all accounts you own and make sure they have two named beneficiaries—primary and contingent. That applies to retirement and investment accounts, as well as life insurance policies.

The probate court appoints an executor— who should be chosen by the decedent and nominated in the will—to carry out the directions in the will, pay any outstanding debts, take care of taxes and oversee the distribution of assets. The process of administering the will can be lengthy, depending upon the size and the complexity of the estate. During probate, the will becomes a public document. Predatory creditors are able to see the will, including the amount of assets and their distribution. In many jurisdictions, there are court fees associated with probate that can take a bite (or a nibble) out of the estate.

Trusts are used to circumvent some of the issues created when assets are passed via a will. Trusts are legal structures that provide protection for assets. The assets in a trust do not belong to the individual, they belong to the trust.  Therefore, they are not subject to probate. When the trust is created, a trustee is named whose job it is to manage the affairs of the trust. A successor trustee is named to manage the trust, if the trustee cannot or will not serve.

The revocable trust is used to take assets out of the estate, while allowing the asset owner to maintain control. Assets can be moved in or out of the trust, or the trust can be dissolved, and the assets taken back. However, there are no tax benefits, since the trust owner is the trust maker, the trustee, and the beneficiary, as long as the owner is alive. On the owner’s passing, the designated successor trustee takes over.

With an irrevocable trust, there are significant tax benefits. However, there is also a loss of control of the assets.

Trusts do cost more to establish than wills, but they offer a number of advantages. The use of a trust means that less or none of your assets will go through probate, speeding up the distribution process. Trusts also protect the family’s privacy, since the details in the trusts do not become part of the public record. There is less involvement by the court in distributing assets, so fees may be lower.

Speak with an estate planning attorney about how trusts may play a useful part in your estate plan and for passing wealth down to multiple generations.

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

Reference: Bankrate (April 17, 2020) “Revocable trust vs. will: A guide to estate planning in the age of coronavirus”

 

Top 10 Reasons to Get Going on an Estate Plan

Top 10 Reasons to Get Going on an Estate Plan: The time to have an estate plan really begins the moment you have assets that need to be distributed, but most people put off this important task. There are more than ten good reasons to talk with an estate planning attorney and get your estate plan in order, says the article “Top ten reasons to create an estate plan today” from OakPark.com, but these ten should be compelling enough to get you started.

10-It’s better to start with a plan than with an emergency. A sudden health crisis, whether a global pandemic or a spouse’s heart attack, should not be the reason for you to get going on your estate plan. Get an estate plan done, before you or a loved one needs it.

9-Don’t hope for the best for your minor children. A will is used to name guardians for minor children and to name a financial guardian who will oversee assets left for them. Without a will, the court will make that decision. The person selected by the judge may not be the person you’d want.

8-Equal is not always fair. If you paid for your oldest child’s college education, and your youngest is still in middle school, how will an equal division of your assets be fair to the child who has yet to go to college? A will and estate plan lets you map out how assets can be distributed equally, taking a variety of factors into consideration.

7-Inheritance begins at age 18, ready or not. With no will, children 18 and over will inherit assets all at once, no questions asked. If you have a son who likes expensive cars, there won’t be anything stopping him from spending his entire inheritance on a Ferrari.

6-Estate planning is an act of love. Couples strengthen their relationship, when they create an estate plan. It’s a love letter to your spouse and your family that demonstrates a tangible desire to protect them.

5-Build personal connections. Asking someone to be there for you and your family when you are the most vulnerable—incapacitated or deceased—is a strong statement of trust. Creating an estate plan cements relationships and sends a clear message that you believe in others to care for your loved ones.

4-Make parenting your college-age children easier. In the eyes of health care privacy laws, your children are strangers to you, once they reach the age of majority in your state (i.e., usually age 18). With young adult health care powers of attorney and HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) privacy waivers in place now, you can be informed and involved in case of an emergency later.

3-The state wants you to have an estate plan. One of the results of the coronavirus pandemic is that many states have made it lawful to have estate plans witnessed and notarized by video conference. You don’t have to leave the house to create or update your estate plan. There are no excuses now!

2-Your mortality is basically 100%. People procrastinate having their estate plans done because who wants to think about death and dying? However, whether or not you procrastinate doesn’t matter. We will all die one day, and an estate plan will make it better for those we leave behind.

1-There is a good chance that you have more time on your hands now, than before the coronavirus pandemic. Call an estate planning lawyer, and get it done. There’s no time like the present.

Reference: OakPark.com (April 15, 2020) “Top ten reasons to create an estate plan today”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

COVID19 Bringing Out Scammers Who Target the Elderly

COVID19 Bringing Out Scammers Who Target the Elderly: The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) tells us that the pandemic is bringing out the worst of scammers, peddling COVID-19 cures and treatments, and finding new ways to get your money or personal information.

Here are their top tips to avoid being scammed:

  • Remember: right now, there is nothing that has been proven to prevent COVID-19. If anyone tries to sell you a cure or a preventative – especially over the phone – just hang up.
  • Anyone who tells you to pay them by gift card, money transfer, cash, or Bitcoin is a scammer. Period. And, if they say they’re from the government, they’re not.
  • Never give your Social Security, bank account, or credit card number to anyone who contacts you. Again, not even if they say they’re from the government.
  • Don’t be rushed. Whatever the call, email, text, or social media post is about, remember that scammers try to rush you. Legit people don’t.
  • Check it out. Before you act on something or share it – stop. Do some research. Do the facts back up the story?

The FTC also reports a rash of scammers pretending to be from the Social Security Administration (SSA), trying to get your Social Security number or your money.

Here’s what to know:

  • Do not trust caller ID. Scam calls may show up on caller ID as the Social Security Administration and look like the agency’s real number, but it’s not the SSA calling.
  • Your Social Security number is not about to be suspended. And your bank accounts are not about to be seized.
  • Don’t verify your Social Security number or any other personal information to anyone who calls out of the blue. If you already did, visit IdentityTheft.gov/SSA to find out what steps you can take to protect your credit and your identity.
  • SSA will never call to threaten your benefits or tell you to wire money, send cash, or put money on gift cards. Anyone who tells you to do those things is a scammer. Every time.

Here’s a great video on avoiding Social Security scams

Read more about recent scams and how to recognize the warning signs

Resources: Federal Trade Commission, 60 and Over in the Time of Covid? Read This, March 30, 2020 and Avoiding SSA scams during COVID-19, April 7, 2020.

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

 

Coronavirus Stimulus Allows Retirees to Tap Funds Early, With Little or No Penalties

Coronavirus Stimulus Allows Retirees to Tap Funds Early With Little or No Penalties: For a limited time, Americans will now be able to withdraw money from tax-deferred accounts without penalties, under the Coronavirus Stimulus law. Rules on taking loans from 401(k)s will also be loosened up, and some retirees will be able to avoid Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) that otherwise would have been costly, says the article “Coronavirus stimulus lets struggling Americans tap retirement accounts early” from the Los Angeles Times.

In some cases, these changes reflect what has been done for retirement savers in previous disasters. However, for the most part, these are more intense than in other events. The chief government affairs officer of the American Retirement Association, Will Hansen, says that we are now in uncharted territory as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The numbers of people filing for unemployment make it likely that many people will be tapping their retirement accounts.

One provision in the bill would allow investors of any age to take as much as $100,000 from their retirement accounts without any early withdrawal penalties. If the money is put back in the account within three years, there won’t be any taxes due. If the money is not put back, taxes can be paid over the course of three years. The law says that the money must be a “coronavirus-related distribution,” but the rules are loose.

People who test positive for the virus, along with anyone who experiences adverse financial consequences as a result of the pandemic, including being unable to find work or childcare, are permitted to make these withdrawals.

The bill also makes it easier to borrow money from 401(k) accounts, raising the limit on these loans from $50,000 to $100,000. The payment dates for any loans due in 2020 are extended for a year.

Retirees in their early 70s were previously required to start taking money out of tax-deferred accounts and start paying taxes on those distributions. The bill also waives these rules.

U.S. individual retirement accounts held nearly $20 trillion in assets at the end of 2019. While those amounts have certainly dropped due to market volatility, Americans still hold a lot of money in retirement accounts.

However, pre- and post-retirees need to think carefully about withdrawing large sums of money now. For pre-retirees, this should only be a last resort. Some professionals think the 401(k)-loan amount is too high and that people will jump to take out too much money, which will never find its way back.

According to a U.S. Government Accountability Office report from 2019, Americans ages 25-55 take approximately $69 billion a year from their retirement accounts. Once the money is gone, it’s not able to earn future tax-deferred returns.

Reference: Los Angeles Times (March 27, 2020) “Coronavirus stimulus lets struggling Americans tap retirement accounts early”

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

CDC Offers Guidelines for COVID19 Workplace Safety as Businesses Re-Open

CDC Offers Guidelines for COVID19 Workplace Safety as Businesses Re-Open: Communities are starting to ease their COVID19 restrictions, which means many businesses will be re-opening under new guidelines. While this is welcome news for many business owners, questions remain about workplace safety. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a great, updated reference site for businesses with a guide to ongoing mitigation and resources for COVID19 prevention and support.

The site offers a special section for Frequently Asked Questions on the following topics: Suspected or Confirmed Cases of COVID-19 in the Workplace, Reducing the Spread of COVID-19 in Workplaces, Healthy Business Operations, Cleaning and Disinfection in the Workplace, and Critical Infrastructure.

The Department of Labor also has a thorough safety guide compiled under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) available for download. This 35-page document is not a standard or regulation, and it creates no new legal obligations. It does contain recommendations as well as descriptions of mandatory safety and health standards. Download the OSHA guide at https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3990.pdf

Resources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Businesses and Workplaces: Plan, Prepare and Respond, updated April 20, 2020.

It is our goal to provide our clients with the highest level of legal services in the areas of Last Will and Testaments, Living Trust, Irrevocable Trusts, Estate Planning, Probate, Asset Protection, and complete Business Planning. If you or someone you know needs information on Florida estate planning, please contact us today at 239-449-8191 to schedule your free consultation.

 

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