Making Sure Your Aging Parent has the Correct Estate Plan in Place

Making Sure Your Aging Parent has the Correct Estate Plan in Place

It’s a delicate discussion, but when parents are aging, their children should find out if their parents have several basic estate planning documents in place and talk about their final wishes. If they have not done any planning, now is the time—before a crisis occurs.  Here at The Dorcey Law Firm, our goal is to transform families for generations to come; something we can only do through proper proactive planning.

The Monterey Herald’s recent article, “Financial planning: Making sure Mom is taken care of,” says to first make sure that they have their basic estate planning documents – a will or trust, power of attorney, and advanced healthcare directives – in place. It is important to be sure these documents fully reflect your parent’s desires. An advanced healthcare directive lets them name a person to make health care decisions on their behalf, while a power of attorney allows a named person to make financial decisions.

Based on the way in which the forms are written, the agent or surrogate can have broad authority, including the ability to access bank accounts, consent to or refuse medical treatment, or to leave instructions for health care.  Big decision, such as whether or not to be resuscitated or have life prolonged artificially, can also be put in writing, thus removing this tough choice from a child or other loved one. To limit these instructions in any specific way, it is important to talk with an experienced attorney, and have these wishes in writing.

Another key document to have is a last will & testament or living trust.  When determining if a trust is advisable, there are many factors to consider, particularly when the goal is to avoid probate after passing away.  These factors include the type of assets, and whether they are held jointly or allow for beneficiary designations; the beneficiaries ages and financial stability; whether planning for future divorce or creditor is a concern; and many more. You should conduct a full inventory of your parent’s accounts, including where they are held and how they are titled, as well as gathering the named beneficiaries on all accounts and policies.

It is also important not to make any major changes without consulting your attorney first.  For example, if your parent has a brokerage account with low-cost basis investment, you will not want to change this to a joint ownership account. The step-up in cost basis that assets receive at the time of death makes it better for the account to remain in their individual name. While you may gain control of the asset doing that (something that can also be accomplished through the power of attorney), you will lose the step up in basis.  A beneficiary designation may suffice.

To inquire more on how our law firm helps families plan for their long-term care needs, whether years in advance or after a health care crisis has occurred, please contact our office for a free consultation at (239) 418-0169.